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Zelle Scams Are On a Rise – Protect Yourself Now!

The majority of reported Zelle scams use pure social engineering, which involves scaring people with false information. Scammers trick people into authorizing money transfers without their knowledge by making fraudulent claims and representations. An email or text message requesting confirmation of a sizable fraudulent Zelle payment is a common scam. When the user responds that they did not authorize the transfer, the con artist calls them again while posing as the bank and using a phone number that belongs to the financial institution. They lead the caller through fictitious instructions on how to reject erroneous claims, which in fact, send money to the thieves.
July 19, 2022
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A group of large American banks, including Bank of America, Chase, Capital One, and Wells Fargo, founded and own Zelle. According to the New York Times, users sent $490 billion through Zelle last year, more than twice the $230 billion through Venmo. It is free. 

As an alternative to nonbank P2P services like PayPal or Venmo, major U.S. banks provide Zelle, an electronic person-to-person payment service. If you have a bank checking or savings account, Zelle is practical, secure, and typically free. These advantages, along with Zelle’s near-instantaneous and irreversible transactions, make the service well-liked not only by customers but also by scammers who have reportedly exploited Zelle to defraud customers out of thousands of dollars.

The BBB noted an increase in Zelle frauds on Facebook Marketplace on Friday. Every week, news reports about Zelle users losing thousands of dollars to money-transfer frauds are published, and banks are being sued by many class actions brought by resentful fraud victims. Members of the Senate banking committee Elizabeth Warren and Robert Menendez wrote to Zelle’s parent company, Early Warning Services, on April 26 to inquire about “the extent to which Zelle allows fraud to flourish and the steps your company is taking to increase consumer protection and help users recover lost funds.”

Plans to use Zelle as a retail payment system may be derailed by the rise of Zelle scams and criticism of its lax security measures. The Wall Street Journal reports that while fellow owner JP Morgan Chase wants to prioritize customer security first, Bank of America, Wells Fargo, and both want to extend Zelle’s payment choices to include in-store shopping.

Fake Websites

The Beginning of a Typical Zelle Scam

An unexpected call, email, or text message that purports to be from your bank or utility company marks the beginning of a typical Zelle scam

Your bank is attempting to authenticate that you performed a Zelle transaction for a specific amount, according to the bank message. The notification from the utility company informs you that if you don’t send payment right away via Zelle, your electricity will be cut off shortly since they haven’t received it. These fraudulent calls may appear to be authentic on your phone’s caller ID thanks to phone number “spoofing.”

Your call will appear to be from your bank or utility company when you call the specified phone number to contest the transaction. After that, you’ll be instructed to send a Zelle transfer in order to purportedly “restore the monies to your account.” Your monies will actually be sent to the con artist through this transaction, which you have approved. The con artist will ask you for your authorization code if your bank needs it to execute a transaction. Other frauds that leverage Zelle include phony relationships, cryptocurrency fraud, suspiciously low-priced concert tickets, and even purported purebred puppy sales.

If you discover you are the victim of a scam, you can contact us for support.

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The Con Artist Poses as The Bank Itself

In one typical con, the con artist poses as the bank itself. You might get a text or email asking you to verify a sizable phony Zelle payment. 

The scammer then calls the user on the phone while posing as the bank after the user responds that they did not authorize the transfer. Usually, the phone number is faked such that the bank’s caller ID displays it. The process for reversing the erroneous claims is then explained to you. However, what actually occurs is that you are sending cash straight to the crooks. Give no personal information over the phone, and avoid clicking links sent to you over text messages by unknown senders.

The majority of reported Zelle scams use pure social engineering, which involves scaring people with false information. Scammers trick people into authorizing money transfers without their knowledge by making fraudulent claims and representations. An email or text message requesting confirmation of a sizable fraudulent Zelle payment is a common scam. When the user responds that they did not authorize the transfer, the con artist calls them again while posing as the bank and using a phone number that belongs to the financial institution. They lead the caller through fictitious instructions on how to reject erroneous claims, which in fact, send money to the thieves.

A notification suggesting that your bank account has been compromised and that you must act right away to fix the issue is the beginning of another common scam. If you reply, the scammers call you back and walk you through the money transfer procedure while posing as your bank. Scammers may also pose as institutions like utility providers in addition to your bank. A scammer acting as her energy company threatened to cancel the account of a woman in Lorain, Ohio, who was then requested for Zelle payments to keep the lights on.

Scam Victim

Never Reply to Unwanted Emails or Text Messages

This guidance is applicable to all alleged frauds, not just those utilizing Zelle. Don’t reply if a communication claims to be from your bank but you didn’t get in touch with them beforehand. 

To learn more about your account and any potential security risks, call your financial institution immediately. You can also notify your bank that you’ve been phished if your account isn’t having any issues. You could cooperate with your bank to protect your account if the phishing effort led you to divulge some personal information.

Keep an eye out for “important” deadlines or requests from fresh audiences. Alarm bells should go out if someone advises you to take immediate action to fix a financial issue. Scammers utilize haste and fright techniques to make you feel panicked and less able to think clearly. Users in the utility scams described in the section above were given a 30-minute window to act before their power was cut off. Hang up the phone right away and contact the company directly if you detect any suspicious behavior from someone requesting quick payment on behalf of your bank, a utility, or another agency.

Also, be on the lookout for requests for new Zelle payments from any banks, companies, or utilities, especially if you’ve never paid them using Zelle previously. For additional information, get in touch with the company directly via their official website or phone number if you ever receive requests to pay with Zelle.

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